Blog

The Rebirth of Conflict (at FIAT), 5 – Conclusion … and the Origins of Operaismo

For Accornero, what the strike demonstrated was the crisis ‘compulsory collaboration’, or what he called the ‘Italian version of bourgeois reformism’ (Accornero, Tronti, et al. 1962: 631), a crisis exemplified by the establishment of the Centre-Left government. The ironic reference to the ‘Italian version’ of bourgeois reformism, served to highlight the authoritarianism of the ‘compromise’…

The Rebirth of Conflict (at FIAT)­, 4 – Mario Tronti

The resumption of the class struggle at FIAT is normal.[1] It assumes an exceptional importance in the specific context in which it burst forth: it was unforeseen, in such a short time, both by the bosses as well as by the workers’ organisations.[2] It is true that the strike network was effectively woven over a…

‘There are no alternatives’ – Franco Fortini (1960)

‘1960’[1] There are no alternatives. This is the truth that each day is repeated to us. There are no alternatives to reality. The world is one. There is no other world. As far as it concerns us, the time-to-come resembles the past. In any case, not even the time-to-come exists: you do not have one. Without being…

The Rebirth of Conflict (at FIAT), 3 – Aris Accornero

Some questions on the FIAT-strike[1] Accornero responds to the explosion of industrial strife. In this post and the next, I have translated responses to questions posed by the journal Problemi del Socialismo by two figures, Aris Accornero and Mario Tronti, Italian workerists (and PCI members) to the strikes that had just erupted at FIAT. Why…

The Rebirth of Conflict (at FIAT), 2

The Oasis of Peace, Shattered Carlo Donat-Cattin had denounced the climate of fear and the absence of a proper defence by the state of union activity at FIAT (and beyond from the interference of the bosses) in the same speech in the house in 1959 as cited in part 1, even before Italy took the…

A ‘mass of molluscs’: reflections on the Quaderni rossi and the managing away of the university

Reading back over some notes on the 1962 strikes at FIAT, I realised the echoes of yesterday resound loudly in the contemporary. In a concise resumé of the development of capitalism in Italy during the so-called ‘economic miracle’ (1958-‘63), the authors of ‘Note sulle condizioni e lo svolgimento dello sciopero alla FIAT’[1] noted the massive…

‘On Panzieri’ – Claudio Napoleoni (1963/’64)

(These are notes made on Raniero Panzieri’s ‘Surplus Value and Planning: notes on the reading of Capital’,[1] by the Marxist economist Claudio Napoleoni. They are, to my knowledge, unpublished in any language. They are undated but thought to be from 1963 or ’64. They can be found in the Gramsci Institute in Turin.)[2] [Panzieri’s] article accepts the…

The Rebirth of Conflict (at FIAT), 1

In this series of posts, I introduce two responses to the resumption of large-scale strike action at FIAT in 1962 by Mario Tronti, philosopher and central figure behind the founding journal of operaismo (Workerism), Quaderni Rossi, and of the founding journal of ‘political’ Workerism, classe operaia, and an Italian Communist Party (PCI) member; as well as by Aris Accornero, trade…

‘The Word that Kills’ – Massimo Cacciari (2007)

The[1] shrill cry of Antigone, ‘like an anguished bird at the sight of its bare nest’,[2] one must be ready to hear in each moment of the tragedy – at times distant, at others imminent. It fills each pause and determines its rhythm. The spoken word cannot free itself of it, but bears it within as its…

Éris: everything is continuous conflict, 4

Conflict Betrayed Michelle Gellrich argues that ‘theory’ has subjected conflict to banishment at least since Plato’s exclusion of the poets from the polis. In particular, it was the tragedians who were to blame for their focus on destabilising conflict and strife, which acted to destabilise, exacerbating the irrational (epithymetikón) appetites thus undermining the logos of the polis.[1] Gellrich claims that…

Loading…

Something went wrong. Please refresh the page and/or try again.


Follow My Blog

Get new content delivered directly to your inbox.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s